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people across syria are dealing with a nationwide internet blackout and a top official at the united nations has harsh words about the deadly civil war which has stretched on for more than a year. the details are next. and powerful storms are smacking the west coast with heavy rain and winds. ♪ [ male announcer ] are you on medicare? do you have the coverage you need? open enrollment ends friday, december 7th. so don't wait. now's the time to get on a path that could be right for you... with unitedhealthcare medicare solutions. call today to learn about the kinds of coverage we offer, including aarp medicarecomplete plans insured through unitedhealthcare. these medicare advantage plans can combine parts a and b, your hospital and doctor coverage... with part d prescription drug coverage, and extra benefits... all in one complete plan... for a $0 monthly premium. no more than what you already pay for medicare part b. unitedhealthcare doesn't stop there. we'll cover 100% of your preventive services... like an annual physical and immunizations... and you'll have the flexibility to cha
where the fiercest fighting in syria's civil war took place. and outrage as victims of sandy discover there are places for them to stay, but nobody told them. >>> as a burn survivor, you think you're all alone. you think you're the only person that has scars on your face or has, you know, skin graphs on your hands. we all have a story. i joined the united states army in 2002 and deployed to iraq. i was driving a humvee and when my friend went over a land mine i was in a medically induced coma. by the time i came out third degree burns on my head, face, arms, hands, portion of my back, portion of my legs. while i was recovering, i remember asking one of the social workers how can i help burn survivors. she said there's a great organization called the phoenix society. they're teaching them different ways to kind of cope. i went to this conference. everyone had big smiles on their face. i made a choice i was going to be positive every single day. and i'm using this positivity to give back to other people. >> please welcome a former u.s. army soldier and ins frags i prags to all of us and
? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wanted him to depart. he is an ally of iran. he has not only killed 40,000 of his own people, he's tried to make a secret nuclear military program, he's helped in providing tens and tens of thousands of missiles to terrorists in lebanon and gaza. he is a loose cannon. we want him gone. we want to see a democratic and peaceful in syria. >> what about the u.s. army corps of engineers is about to build a top secret underground facility at an israeli air base outside of tel aviv. >> know nothing about it whatsoever. >> you don't know nothing
this period? and related to this, as we all know, there is a war -- a civil war happening in syria. iran is a wrote ally of the assad regime. how is that affecting iran yeas security calculations? -- iran's security calculations? are they going to insert that into the p-5 plus one dialogue? how will you answer the questions? >> of course the middle east has stranged. the syrian war and now this confrontation between israel and hamas that somehow brought us back to the middle east that we used to know, the israelis and the arabs going at it and egypt. but right before that iran saw its for turns decline. its popularity in the arab streets declined because of the arab spring, and then the syrian situation has introduced some very, very important elements, almost sectarian element that declined -- that eroded iranian influence in the region and the projection of the iranian power hit a brick wall with that. so all of this of course closed into the mix of what iran is thinking. and this is one of the reasons this is a good time to start negotiating with iran. as its reach in the middle east
like a straightforward issue in terms of intervening on syria, you only have five permanent members of the security council. and they cannot agree on something like this. you know, what has happened, obviously i think in the past couple decades, there's been an information revolution that has led to expectations that you articulated. in the gaza, it is live, in damascus, it is live. we have expectations for action. when we observe things like that, they are not seen it, there were not noted here our expectations are former limited. today, the public is globally connected and has certain expectations. and yet international institutions have not evolved in a powerful way. we still of the same institutions that have a political order since 2002. nobody can figure out how to do it. host: what is your relationship with benjamin netanyahu? guest: i do not have one. host: what about what is going on and syria, supplely into this current conflict? guest: it does. it does in two ways. in one way, it pushed syria off the front pages in the arab world. anytime you have a flare up on palestine,
in 60 minutes n syria, two car bombs exploded in a town near damascus. the number of people wounded and killed is high and rising. at least 45 people, mostly civilians are reported dead. more than 100 injured. the bombs went off in a town known as a refuge for people forced from their homes by this civil war in syria. they weren't the only explosions. two bombs went off at the same time in a residential neighborhood in damascus. we don't know yet how many people are hurt or who is claiming responsibility. this is the wreckage of a syrian air force jet crashed and burning not far from aleppo. rebel fighters claim they shot it down and captured one of the pilots. this is amateur film. a cnn crew was just on the scene after the crash. rebels saying they also shot down a government helicopter yesterday. that captured on video. take a look. an opposition group posted its facebook page that the free syrian army brought down the helicopter with an anti aircraft weapon. we don't know what happened to the people who were actually on board that helicopter. we want to go straight to washington
, but neither do i see it as very helpful in pressing russia on issues like iran or their conduct towards syria. russian opposition level leaders, however, and russian civil society, and the russian press, what free press remains in russia today really support this legislation. and i think what this legislation intends is sort of a mutually beneficial relationship with russia based on a rule of law. based on human rights. that's the hope. it includes the sergei magnitsky legislation that came out of the foreign affairs committee of which i am an original co-sponsor, and i do think we owe a debt of gratitude to chairman ros-lehtinen for her determination to have that provision in the legislation. and i think if we reflect on the words of the russian opposition in their parliament, one said recently, this provision is very pro-russian. it helps defend us in russia from criminals. it helps defend us from criminals who kill our citizens, who steal our money, and hide it abroad. and that's the point. that's what we are trying to do with that provision. and this bill liberalizing trade while at the s
, from the democratic republic of the conga, egypt, syria. at a time of tightening budgets, i do in that's a worthy question. are we doing enough to keep our diplomats safe? >> i wanted to ask you about the co c congo, you've been concerned about the rebels. reportedly withdrawing from eastern congo. what more should the united states be doing to put pressure on this. >> assistant secretary of state johnny carson returning today from a meeting with regional leaders and vie taken the step of joining with several of my colleagues, senators durbin and boessman and others introducing today an amendment to the defense authorization act that would impose sanctions on individuals, leaders and countries that provide material support to m23. watchers, listenering might wonder why this is an important matter. a huge conflict in eastern c no go that took 5 million lives in last decade and it's vital we take strong steps in supporting the u.n. security council resolution that calls for m23 to withdraw from goma and negotiate a path forward that reduces tensions and violence in the critical part of t
jeunesse, thank you. live in l.a. watching that story for us. martha? martha: in syria people are losing access now to the outside world as fighting continues between rebels and government troops. a paralyzing situation. we're live in the middle east. bill: also immigration, health care, two of the biggest stories and they're both happening in the state of arizona. governor jan brewer is here to defend some of her recent decisions live. we'll talk to her in a moment. i'm only in my 60's... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. call now to request your free decision guide. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i kn
news has obtained a classified cable showing that the state department was warned about syria's security concerns long before the attack was carried out. also three u.s. senators are calling for a congressional committee to investigate the administration's handling of the attack. molly henneberg is in washington with more. hi, molly. >> hi. this classified cable was sent august 16 to the state department that was less than one month before the september 11 attack in libya. and it describes how u.s. personnel on the ground were making contingency plans. the cable reads in part, quote: this daily pattern of violence would be the new normal for the foreseeable future. went on to say, quote, personnel could co- locate to the annex, talking about the c.i.a. annex -- if the security environment downgraded suddenly. it also reveals they were concerned about the trustworthiness of the libyan militia, the 17 february brigade, which was protecting the consulate, noting, quote, certain sectors of the 17 february brigade were very hesitant to share information with the americans. one repu
to worse, the brutality in this war unfolding in syria. what's the latest? >> reporter: absolutely. what you're referring to, wolf, is this cluster bomb to the east of damascus which now human rights watch having studied activist video heard from activists on the ground pretty certain cluster bombs were used. they say it looks like soviet -- they say witnesses say there was no specific rebel target in the area around there which they could have been aiming at. and of course applying pressure for the world to stop using cluster munitions specifically here of course for the syrian regime to stop hitting civilian targets, wolf. >> and the brutality is really unbelievable. about 40,000 people so far have been killed in this war over the past year and a half. who knows how many have been injured or made homeless, refugees streaming into syria, jordan, other countries in the region. is there any positive signs whatsoever that this may be coming to an end any time soon? >> reporter: well, of course there's two different sides to that. the fear with the cluster bombs as the regime get put on the
. look at the inauction of the united states in the regard to syria. >> gretchen: it would be interesting to look at the votes. maybe we could ask the brown room. i bet she has the votes. >> brian: don't say brain room do this. and go on line and make the request like everybody else. none of the short cuts. >> gretchen: we should say that the brain room are the intelligent people who work here in fox news and do research. >> brian: you can expedite the request. >> steve: hope they're watching our channel. >> gretchen: in the meantime yasser arafat poisoned. palestinian authorities think so . so why you were sleepping they open up the grave and took samples of his remain under the cover of few sheets. there is persistant speculation in the last eight years that israel poisoned the 75 year old leadership . israel denies the claim. spoonful of medicine washed down by grapefruit juice could kill you . the list is growing from 17 to 43. on it lipitor. the problem chemical in grapefruit that messes up how your body breaks down drugs. it could basically cause a drug overdose. >> record powerball
considering potential success of the operation against the facility in syria. and this will all remove iran's constraints to acquire nuclear weapons. so we are either -- really concerned with the situation. let me add people of iran will continue to suffer under very tough sanctions. so there are two things which must change. diplomacy and the inspections. first diplomacy. five plus one has served the purpose of the it united front. five plus one mean to me united nations security council related global responsibility, europeans like to prefer three plus three which means the european union is the major player. i'm nervous about that, if you are europe you had better say three plus three otherwise you will not be served your dinner. five plus one, of course, it is important to keep on. i think u.s. should not do what it has done, hide inside this group. u.s. has now tried to take responsibility. to change, to start with its relations with iran. isn't it time now to sort of give up on the occupation of the u.s. embassy in connection with islamic revolution 1979? should the iranians try to fo
in on some of the same elements of the bar gain. jon: let's turn our attention to syria. the bloodshed goes on there, some would say that it has been, i mean, that world attention has been focused on what's been going on between hamas and the israelis, maybe the egyptian protests while the syrians continue to kill their own people with the support of iran. what do you think? >> yeah, i mean, look, you know, it's coming up now on two years since relatively peaceful demonstrations turned into, essentially, a civil war. and the reality is there has been so much blood that has been spilled, that it's going to negate the possibility of a negotiated settlement between the assads and the opposition and, tragically, not enough blood has been spilled in order to prompt a divided international community, and the administration is very warily -- i would argue rightly, frankly -- about getting dragged into an open-ended military intervention ford to topple the assads. maybe there's a few more things we can do. arming some of the rebels that we vet, maybe considering up a sort of passive no-fly zone wit
's dealing with syria gaza, the congo. she's still our representative to the united nations. so while we're talking this foolishness about her appearance on a tv talk show, what signal is that sending to the rest of the world? i do think they've got themselves backed in a corner now. i think the other agenda going on is the senate race. so i think that it needs to stop. i hope it will today. i know she's back on the hill again today. >> bill: she is. first of all, it is unfair at so many levels. i think it is sexist and racist. ambassador to the united nations, god knows is not responsible for security. embassies and consulates around the world number one. we talked about this earlier. number two, all she did in her appearance on the sunday shows and in her testimony right after the incident in benghazi on the hill was say here is what our intelligence agencies are telling us at this point. we don't know everything about it yet. you know. and that's -- that's kind of classic. you never know, right? immediately, al
this work. >> we appreciate hearing those voices. >> it's a shameful situation. >>> syria pulled the plug on the outside world. reports that nearly all access to the internet has been shut off. lan lines have been shut off. rebel forces abuse the internet to their advantage. it comes as forces battle. if rebels can capture the airport, it would be a severe blow to the assad regem. all that as they march toward 40,000. >> accused of passing thousands of classified government documents to wikileaks. bradley manning is back in court today. yesterday, he testified he's been treated harshly while in military custody. the defense requested the hearing to ask that the charges against him be dismissed. >>> mitt romney and president obama promising to stay in touch. the formal rivals spent an hour discussing ideas to. a source tells cnn there's no discussion for a roll for romney in the obama administration. just a civil lunch. >>> a truck goes into a bar -- no, this is not the set up to a joke, folks. take a look at the result. police say the driver of a snap-on tools truck lost control, knocked
it be in the middle east which you read about everyday, whether it be syria, whether it be iran, pakistan. the sunni-shia fault lines in the middle east, where there be out in the pacific in china. we look at what is going on with the islands within the pacific, korea and 29-year-old leader in charge of korea. what is he going to do in the future? we have narcoterrorism and transnational narco-terrorism. what does that mean to the future and security of our country? i don't know. these are questions we have to take a look at and these are questions that we have to be prepared to operate in. the other thing that i have learned frankly the hard way over the last several years is that you also have what i call opportunists, who will try to take advantage of this instability in destabilizing influence and nascent governments are failing governments and these opportunists may be unpredictable. i always use iraq as an example. there are lots of opportunists in iraq, iran, turkey, saudi arabia and nonstate actors all opportunists trying to take advantage of the situation. how does that project itself aroun
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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